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Common Problems in High School Writing

YourEssayHelpers assist Writing Essays High School Reviews and Guide

❶Start with list posts, review posts, news posts, video posts, and top-ten posts.

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Something to make them laugh? Something to make them cry? Consider having your class vote on the top three pieces and printing them to give to the graduates. Students always perk up for an authentic audience and a connection to the real world. Introduce them to one of the many free blogging platforms and let them blog about a topic that truly interests them. Choice blogging makes a great genius-hour option. You can devote one day a week or every other week to letting students write about their passions on their own blogs, simply by assigning a different topic each week.

Start with list posts, review posts, news posts, video posts, and top-ten posts. Eventually, you can let them choose their own format, as long as they produce a post each week.

Ask each student to begin a story on a blank piece of paper, introducing a main character. After a while, have them stop and fold their paper then trade with another student.

You want the next person to only be able to see the last couple of lines of the beginning. In this next round, everyone will write the middle of the story, taking the character into some kind of conflict before moving the story toward resolution.

Finally, have those students fold their papers so only a few lines are visible and trade with another student. When the next writers begin, let them know that they should bring the stories to an end.

Then they should return the story to the original writer. The results will no doubt make everyone laugh.

Using these words as prompts, she and the students construct the sentence, "I made cookies in the kitchen in the morning. Then she asks them, "Tell me more. Do the cookies have chocolate chips? Does the pizza have pepperoni? Rather than taking away creativity, Bradshaw believes this kind of structure gives students a helpful format for creativity.

Stephanie Wilder found that the grades she gave her high school students were getting in the way of their progress. The weaker students stopped trying. Other students relied on grades as the only standard by which they judged their own work. She continued to comment on papers, encourage revision, and urge students to meet with her for conferences. But she waited to grade the papers.

It took a while for students to stop leafing to the ends of their papers in search of a grade, and there was some grumbling from students who had always received excellent grades. But she believes that because she was less quick to judge their work, students were better able to evaluate their efforts themselves. Erin Pirnot Ciccone, teacher-consultant with the Pennsylvania Writing and Literature Project , found a way to make more productive the "Monday morning gab fest" she used as a warm-up with her fifth grade students.

She conceived of "Headline News. After the headlines had been posted, students had a chance to guess the stories behind them. The writers then told the stories behind their headlines. As each student had only three minutes to talk, they needed to make decisions about what was important and to clarify details as they proceeded.

On Tuesday, students committed their stories to writing. Slagle, high school teacher and teacher-consultant with the Louisville Writing Project Kentucky , understands the difference between writing for a hypothetical purpose and writing to an audience for real purpose. She illustrates the difference by contrasting two assignments.

Write a review of an imaginary production of the play we have just finished studying in class. They must adapt to a voice that is not theirs and pretend to have knowledge they do not have. Slagle developed a more effective alternative: Authenticity in Writing Prompts. Mark Farrington, college instructor and teacher-consultant with the Northern Virginia Writing Project , believes teaching revision sometimes means practicing techniques of revision.

An exercise like "find a place other than the first sentence where this essay might begin" is valuable because it shows student writers the possibilities that exist in writing. In his college fiction writing class, Farrington asks students to choose a spot in the story where the main character does something that is crucial to the rest of the story.

At that moment, Farrington says, they must make the character do the exact opposite. Bernadette Lambert, teacher-consultant with the Kennesaw Mountain Writing Project Georgia , wondered what would happen if she had her sixth-grade students pair with an adult family member to read a book. She asked the students about the kinds of books they wanted to read mysteries, adventure, ghost stories and the adults about the kinds of books they wanted to read with the young people character-building values, multiculturalism, no ghost stories.

Using these suggestions for direction, Lambert developed a list of 30 books. From this list, each student-adult pair chose one. They committed themselves to read and discuss the book and write separate reviews. Most of the students, says Lambert, were proud to share a piece of writing done by their adult reading buddy.

Several admitted that they had never before had this level of intellectual conversation with an adult family member. One day, in front of the class, she demonstrated tension with a rubber band. Looped over her finger, the rubber band merely dangled. Linebarger revised a generic writing prompt to add an element of tension. The initial prompt read, "Think of a friend who is special to you.

Write about something your friend has done for you, you have done for your friend, or you have done together. Students talked about times they had let their friends down or times their friends had let them down, and how they had managed to stay friends in spite of their problems. In other words, we talked about some tense situations that found their way into their writing. Moving From Fluency to Flair. Ray Skjelbred, middle school teacher at Marin Country Day School, wants his seventh grade students to listen to language.

He wants to begin to train their ears by asking them to make lists of wonderful sounding words. They may use their own words, borrow from other contributors, add other words as necessary, and change word forms.

Grammar, Poetry, and Creative Language. Students attach their comments to a piece of writing under consideration. While I was reading your piece, I felt like I was riding a roller coaster. It started out kinda slow, but you could tell there was something exciting coming up. But then it moved real fast and stopped all of a sudden. I almost needed to read it again the way you ride a roller coaster over again because it goes too fast.

Anna Collins Trest, director of the South Mississippi Writing Project , finds she can lead upper elementary school students to better understand the concept of "reflection" if she anchors the discussion in the concrete and helps students establish categories for their reflective responses.

She decided to use mirrors to teach the reflective process. Each student had one. As the students gazed at their own reflections, she asked this question: Trest talked with students about the categories and invited them to give personal examples of each. Then she asked them to look in the mirrors again, reflect on their images, and write. One of his strategies has been to take his seventh-graders on a "preposition walk" around the school campus. Walking in pairs, they tell each other what they are doing:.

I walk among my students prompting answers," Ireland explains. Kim Stafford, director of the Oregon Writing Project at Lewis and Clark College , wants his students to discard old notions that sentences should be a certain length.

He describes the exercise he uses to help students experiment with sentence length. Stafford compares the first style of sentence construction to a river and the second to a drum.

It is crucial for every essay that you follow the instructions given which include sticking to a word limit if given, answering the essay question , and completing the essay by the deadline. In addition a high school essay requires that you follow the appropriate essay structure and learn to properly reference your sources.

If you are given a choice of topics, brainstorm ideas and then choose a topic that you are interested in or have knowledge about so that your enthusiasm and knowledge of the subject matter shines through in your essay. Thus, their essays lack clear central idea, and the connection between body paragraphs is very weak.

To avoid this, try to narrow your essay topic to some particular point. Essay Structure click to enlarge. High school essays are structured very similarly regardless of the topic and good essay structure will help you to write a clear essay that flows from one paragraph to the next. An introduction should end with thesis statement — a sentence that will reveal your main point. Limit each paragraph to one main idea.


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Overview of common writing problems of high school students. Writing help, plus links to online high school/college prep courses in grammar and essay writing.

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Help for High School is a self-directed writing program for teens that both teaches rhetorical thinking in writing, as well as the academic essay formats for high school and college. Teens work independently of their parents, however models of completed assignments and rubrics for feedback are included, as well.

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1. Use the shared events of students' lives to inspire writing. Debbie Rotkow, a co-director of the Coastal Georgia Writing Project, makes use of the real-life circumstances of her first grade students to help them compose writing that, in Frank Smith's words, is "natural and purposeful.". When a child comes to school with a fresh haircut or a . High School Essay Writing Help What are the Requirements for a High School Essay? High school students are required to write essays on a variety of topics which at first may seem to have nothing in common.

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Online writing help for high school students - Leave your essays to the most talented writers. Proofreading and editing help from best professionals. Qualified writers working in the company will accomplish your task within the deadline. More essay help Each teacher is essay writing help for high school students somewhat different inside her needs. This list comprises essay topics centered on a range of genres. This entry was posted in Writing Help For High School Students on September 11, by wabash-editor.